What Is Traveling In Basketball?

Traveling In Basketball: What Is Traveling In Basketball?

Basketball is a sport that requires quick movement and agility. It’s also a favorite of many Americans, as it brings people together to enjoy the game. Many people will be hitting the courts soon to get their game on. There are a few things you should remember when traveling in basketball. This blog post explores how traveling in basketball can be tricky but still enjoyable!

Traveling In Basketball

What Is Traveling In Basketball?

Traveling is one of the most common infractions made by players. Traveling occurs when it is determined that a player has taken more than two steps after receiving the ball, ending his dribble. A player gets to take two steps without putting the ball on the floor after gaining control of an in-bounds pass. However, if the player lifts both feet without first stopping the ball, he has traveled. This can be called on offensive or defensive players and only applies to games played under official basketball rules (as opposed to street basketball).

The referee will whistle when he sees a player traveling, and then the ball is turned over to the opposing team. A player cannot dribble and run with the ball; he must stop and restart his dribble after every two steps. If he takes more than two steps, it’s an automatic turnover.

There are a few exceptions to traveling: if a player catches the ball while in the air and lands on both feet (known as a “double-dribble”), or picks up the ball off of the floor and starts dribbling before taking more than two steps, that’s not considered traveling. Players are also allowed to pick up their dribble and walk with the ball as long as they keep one hand on the ball at all times.

If a player picks up the ball to shoot, he cannot pick it up again to try for an easier shot unless another player has touched the ball since he picked it up. This is known as a “carry” and results in a turnover.

Three common cases of “traveling in basketball”:

When you receive the ball while moving

– You receive the ball while moving without it touching other players

– Only take one step in any direction without dribbling after catching the ball

– Dribble the basketball before taking another step

Traveling is usually assessed when a player takes more than two steps, moves his pivot foot or loses possession of the ball. It also typically occurs during fast breaks where a player catches up to someone who was previously ahead of him. 

When you receive the ball while stationary

When you receive the ball while stationary, you usually cannot take more than one step without dribbling.

One exception is when your pivot foot moves without the ball before you catch it. In this case, one step is allowed with that pivot foot to recover from its movement.

– Receive the ball with both hands, turn in one direction and then bring the ball to a stop

– Begin holding onto the basketball again with at least one hand 

– If you have not taken any steps after stopping and grabbing onto the basketball for a second time, it would be considered a legal move. It doesn’t matter if both hands or just one hand has grabbed onto the basketball after stopping, as long as there hasn’t been another step taken. You would then be able to take another step in any direction, as long as you dribble the ball first. 

– If you do take a step after re-grabbing the ball, that counts as your one step and the other team gets the ball back.

When you start dribbling

You pick up the ball from the floor and start dribbling, but don’t take more than two steps:

– You pick up the ball from the floor with your hands

– Start dribbling with at least one hand on the ball

– Take two steps forward or backward

– The referee blows the whistle and calls a turnover and possession to the other team. If you take more than two steps while dribbling, that would be considered traveling.

The Pivot Foot in basketball 

Your pivot foot is usually the same foot as your shooting hand. It’s the foot that you “pivot” on when you spin around to face the other way. Your pivot foot is the foot that you jump off of when you shoot. When you catch (receive) the ball, your pivot foot becomes the stationary foot and the other foot becomes your jumping foot. You can only take one step with your jumping foot after receiving the ball. If you take a step with your stationary foot, that would be traveling.

If you receive the ball while in motion, then your pivot foot becomes the moving foot and the other foot becomes your stationary foot. You can take two steps with your moving foot as long as you dribble between each step. If you don’t dribble between each step, then it’s considered traveling.

There are different rules for when your pivot changes: 

– If you catch the ball with your right foot as a pivot, then step onto your right foot with your left foot as a jumping foot and raise the ball to shoot, it would be illegal for you to take more than one step.

– If you receive the ball while taking a step forward with your right pivoting foot, moving toward the basket, even though your jump stop move does not involve a dribble you can go directly into a shot or pass after landing on two feet. If you choose to dribble, then it would be considered traveling.

– If you catch the ball with your right foot as a pivot, then step onto your left foot with your right foot as a jumping foot and raise the ball to shoot, that would be legal for you to take multiple steps.

What Are The Rules Of Traveling In Basketball? 

What happens when players have traveling to a basketball game? The consequences for traveling can depend on the severity of the offense. If it’s a minor traveling violation, then the player will likely just lose the ball. If it’s a more serious offense, then the player may be called for a technical foul and/or give up possession of the ball.

There are also times when a player can get ejected from the game for committing too many traveling violations. This is rare, but it does happen occasionally.

It is important to always pay attention to what you’re doing while you’re playing basketball so that you don’t end up committing any traveling violations and costing your team the game.

– You cannot pass, intercept or shoot if you’re jumping for the ball. It doesn’t matter how it came to your possession, you cannot pass or shoot.

– To dribble the ball, you need to bounce it on the floor consecutively with one hand. You can’t just pick up and drop down the ball all over again. If you do that, then that’s traveling.

– You can’t carry the ball by holding it in between your legs for more than three seconds. Dribbling rules also apply if you’re carrying the ball in between your legs too.

– The most important rule of all is that once you stop dribbling (I..e after taking two steps), you have to make a move downwards with either hand or pass or shoot within 3 seconds (4 seconds at the college level). This is enforced because otherwise, it would be impossible for the defense to steal the ball. (A player is allowed to stop dribbling- not carrying or dribbling–if he is guarded closely.)

– If you catch the pass while running forwards towards the opponent’s goal, you can take two steps in any direction without losing possession of the ball. However, if you stop after taking just one step, then that should be treated as traveling unless you are guarded closely by an opposition player.

– A player cannot have control of both hands on the ball at once or have his pivot foot grounded simultaneously while being airborne. He has to choose which way he wants to dribble before starting his dribble and changing hand/foot touching will be ruled traveling by officials.

There are many other rules and stipulations that can occur while playing basketball, but knowing these basic traveling violations is a good place to start. As long as you’re aware of the rules and what is legal, you’ll be able to stay out of trouble on the court. Just remember to always keep your head up and pay attention to what’s going on around you!

While there are many things that can happen during a game of basketball, understanding the basic rules for traveling is essential. In short, traveling is when a player takes more than two steps without dribbling or one step if he’s already in the air. There are also specific circumstances like carrying the ball between your legs that constitute as traveling. If you’re aware of all of the rules for what you can and can’t do when playing basketball, then you won’t ever have to worry about committing traveling violations.

Some Popular Examples Of Traveling Violations In Basketball?

Pivot Slide

The player gathers the ball with both hands and takes more than two steps without dribbling. During his last step, he is in the air and after two steps he lands with one foot completely off the floor (jump stop) before passing or shooting.

Double Dribble

A double dribble occurs when a player picks up the ball to initiate a new dribble, but stops suddenly because another player touched the ball by accident. He then starts his dribble again which is illegal since touching the ball twice consecutively constitutes as double-dribbling. This rule was introduced by FIBA(International Basketball Federation) way back during 1967.

Early Step

This is illegal because a player may not have one foot on the floor and another in the air. Once a player plants his pivot foot, he can only step with it again if he has possession of the ball or stops dribbling. When he jumps, both feet must leave the court together.

Hand-Checking

In basketball, physical contact between opposing players is illegal and this includes hand-checking. Players are allowed to use their hands to maintain a position but cannot make contact with an opponent when trying to move around him. This rule was also added by FIBA during 1967 as well. Of course, there are many other rules that can be applied during a game of basketball but knowing these basic traveling violations will help you protect yourself from getting penalized. Just remember to pay attention to what’s going on during the game and you’ll be able to avoid committing these types of mistakes!

Dribbling To The Basket When Guarded Closely

This rule was added to prevent players from just dribbling the ball and then shooting without giving the defense a chance. If you’re being closely guarded, you can only take one step before you need to either shoot or pass the ball. If you take two steps, that’s considered traveling.

Carrying The Ball

Carrying the ball is when a player picks up the basketball with one hand and doesn’t dribble it continuously on the floor. If he takes more than 2 steps with the ball in his possession, that’s also traveling. 

Picking Up The Ball And Dropping It To Start A New Dribble

This is another form of double dribble and it happens when a player picks up the ball, stops dribbling, and then starts dribbling again. This is illegal because it’s considered picking up the ball twice in a row.

Up and Down

A player may not be the first to touch a live ball from a rebound or throw-in that has touched any other player. If this happens, the only time he may take more than two steps is after holding the ball for at least one full second. This rule was also introduced by FIBA during 1967 as well.

Rebound Shuffle

This is also illegal because a player cannot be the first to touch the ball after the rim or backboard. It’s not considered shoving if he maintains contact with his opponent and it’s not traveling unless he takes more than two steps without dribbling.

Screening

When an offensive player sets a screen, he must give his teammate room to stop and start. A defender can’t stand in front of him or try to go around him until he moves. If a screener has both feet on the floor, then it’s legal even if either foot is off the floor while setting a pick. This rule was also added by FIBA during 1967 as well.

Three-Point Steps

When traveling to the basket for a shot or layup, you cannot take more than three consecutive steps without dribbling the ball. If you take more than three steps, it’s considered traveling and if your pivot foot is not established in this case it will be called double dribble.

3 Seconds In The Paint

A player cannot stay in the key for more than three seconds at a time without actively guarding an opponent or trying to get open for a shot. If he does, he’ll be called for violating this rule. However, if the three seconds are counted after a control or dribble, then it’s not considered breaking this rule because he is actively trying to score.

This rule was also added by FIBA during 1967 as well.

Last 2 Minutes/Overtime

During the last two minutes of every period and overtime period, there should be an 8-foot basket inbounds closer to the end line underneath the backboard (it will only be used in these situations). The ball must hit this basket for a goal-tend call to be made; otherwise, no goal tending can be called. This basket counts only when the shooter is outside of this circle surrounding it and any player touching it commits a violation. Make sure that no other players are touching this basket or it will be considered as goaltending.

Goalie Free Throw

This situation is similar to an inbounds play because only certain players are allowed to stand under the goal while a player shoots free throws. A goalie that leaves the area before the whistle is blown commits a violation and the shooter gets one point plus possession of the ball out-of-bounds at half court. This rule was also introduced by FIBA during 1967 as well. 

Some Moves That You Need To Do Properly To Avoid Traveling Violations:

There are other moves that you can use to improve your chances of avoiding traveling violations, but these are some of the most effective. Practice them in a game situation and see how they work for you. Keep in mind that the best way to avoid getting called for a traveling is to keep your pivot foot on the ground at all times. If you’re ever in doubt, just stop dribbling and wait for the referee to make a call.

The Euro-Step

This move is named after European players who popularized it in the NBA. It’s a little more complicated than a normal crossover, and you’ll need some space to do it. Start by dribbling with your dominant hand toward the defender and then take a step across your body with your back foot while quickly switching the ball to your other hand. You should now be facing the basket so take another step in that direction with your front foot and shoot or pass.

If you’re having trouble with the defender stealing the ball, you can also use this move to create some space. After crossing over, stop and pop back out so the defender has to go around you. This will give you a few more seconds to make your next move.

Gather Step

After gaining control of the ball, the player shall take one step with his/her non-pivot foot; or, if he/she has dribbled the ball, he/she may take a step in any direction.

This is a basic motion that you’ll need to do in order to keep the ball from being stolen. After gaining control of the ball, quickly take a step with your non-pivot foot so you can start moving in the desired direction. You can also use this step to crossover to the other hand.

Catch and Shoot

If you’re stationary, you can only catch the ball with one hand if it was shot at you specifically. If you’re moving, then you can’t catch it with one hand.

This is another basic motion that you’ll need to know in order to shoot the ball. When you catch the ball, make sure to do it with both hands and then quickly release it so you can take advantage of the defender being off balance. You can also use this move when you’re driving to the basket.

Step Back Shot

This is a great move to use against bigger, stronger defenders. It’s also not as easy as it sounds so be sure to practice those footwork skills before giving this bad boy a try in a real game situation.

First, make your defender believe you’re going with the usual dribble moves and shake him off by pulling back quickly – watch out for poking hands – and getting some space between you two. Most defenders will retreat or go around you at this stage, which is perfect because now you can shoot over them. As the ball goes up into the air, take a few steps backward while maintaining eye contact with your target. Then jump straight up into the air and follow through on your shot when the ball reaches its highest point for the most power.

Late Dribble

This is when you try to make a move on your defender but haven’t gotten low enough to drive. This can leave you looking very silly if the ball gets swatted away.

When dribbling down the floor, most players will take early or medium-speed dribbles in order to stop themselves from getting caught up by the defense. Late-speed dribbles are more predictable and thus easier for defenders to predict, which means they have time to get ready for stealing it or blocking your shot. If you do this, not only does your defender have an easy steal but also an open lane to run toward because he knows there’s no way he can be blocked with neither distance nor timing working in his favor.

If you want another way to avoid traveling violations, be sure to practice your footwork and ball-handling skills. These moves will give you an edge against any defender and could be the difference between scoring and losing the ball.

The Pump Fake

This move is used to get the defender to jump and then you can either shoot or pass. Start by dribbling toward the defender with your dominant hand and then take a step to the side with your back foot while quickly raising the ball up in front of you. You should now be facing away from the basket, so take a step in that direction with your front foot and shoot or pass.

If you’re having trouble getting the shot off, you can also use this fake to create some space. After raising the ball, quickly spin away from the defender so they have to go around you.

The In-And-Out Move

This move is used when you are being guarded closely, or if there isn’t much space between you and the defender. Start by coming toward the defender with your dominant hand and then take a step across your body with your back foot while quickly bringing the ball behind your opposite leg. Then bring it back out in front of yourself on the side opposite from where you first placed it. You should now be facing away from the basket, so take a step in that direction with your front foot and shoot or pass.”

If you’re having trouble getting the shot off, use this same motion to create some space by stopping half way through and popping back out of it.

Up And Under

This move is a great way to get an easy bucket. It’s also perfect for your defender to foul you as he tries to go for the steal – quick hands, big fella.

Start by dribbling toward the right side of the basket and then quickly swing the ball behind your back with your dominant hand. As you do this, drive hard at the rim and take a step with your front foot before jumping up into the air off that same foot. Follow through past horizontal on your shot or pass as you gather yourself from raising from the ground. Land on both feet and hold that position while watching what’s going on near the hoop – there’s nothing worse than getting an easy bucket only to have it snatched away because you’re stuck watching the ball.

Spin Move 

This is another move that can be used to get past a defender, but it’s a little more risky than the step back shot. Again, you’ll need some space to pull this one off, and your defender should be biting on your fake dribble moves.

Start by dribbling with your dominant hand toward the defender and then quickly spin the ball around your back with your other hand. Take a step forward with your front foot as you do this so you’re now facing the basket. Again, take another step in that direction with your front foot and shoot or pass.

If the defender is still giving you trouble, you can also use this move to create some space. After spinning the ball behind your back, stop and then quickly go into a shot or pass. This will give you a few more seconds to make your next move. 

One advantage of this move is that it can also help you get around a defender if they’re guarding you closely. After spinning, stop and pop back out so the defender has to go around you again.

Catching The Ball While Running Before A Dribble 

This move is perfect for getting yourself an open shot, especially if you’re being closely guarded.

Start by dribbling the ball with your dominant hand down the floor and then suddenly stop. As you do this, quickly catch the ball with your other hand and take a step back into space. From here, you can either shoot or drive to the hoop. If you choose to drive, make sure you go straight at the defender – there’s no need to crossover or change directions in the middle of the move.

This move can also be used when receiving a pass from a teammate. Simply catch the ball while running and take a step back into space before making your next move.

These are just a few of the many possible moves you can use to shake the defender and get an easy basket. If you already have a move that works for you, then great! You’ve just saved yourself some practice time. If not, be sure to keep practicing these moves until they feel natural. 

The Dribble Stop Hop

As you make this move, start with your dominant hand dribbling down toward the left side of the basket at medium speed while stepping forward with your right foot into the air off that same foot. Land on both feet and hold that position as you watch what’s going on near the hoop.

Now, quickly hop up off the ground with your left foot while bringing the ball up and over your right shoulder. Follow through past horizontal on your shot or pass as you gather yourself from raising from the ground. Land on both feet and hold that position while watching what’s going on near the hoop.

This move can also be used when receiving a pass from a teammate – simply catch the ball while running and take a step back into space before making your next move.

 

FAQs:

Is Catching An Air Ball Traveling?

It is not traveling if you catch the ball while you are in the air and then come down with both feet on the ground.

When you’re playing in a game, there’s always a chance that the ball will be shot at you from long range. If you’re able to catch it, make sure to do it with both hands and then come down with both feet on the ground. This will ensure that you don’t get called for a traveling violation. 

When I Receive The Ball On The Move, How Many Steps Can I Take Before Passing Or Shooting?

You are allowed two steps to gather the ball and then one step to shoot or pass.

If you’re moving with the ball, you’re only allowed to take two steps before you have to either shoot or pass. This will help keep the defense from getting too close to you. Take a quick first step and then gather the ball so you can make a decision on what to do next. If you see an opening, go ahead and shoot; if not, then pass it to a teammate. Remember, it’s always better to take a few seconds and make the right decision than it is to hurry and make a mistake.

Can I Touch The Floor Consecutively With The Same Foot Or Both Feet After Gaining Control Of The Ball?

No, this is traveling.

Touching the floor consecutively with the same foot or both feet after gaining control of the ball will result in a traveling violation. Be sure to keep your pivot foot on the ground at all times so you don’t have to worry about this. If you’re ever in doubt, just stop dribbling and wait for the referee to make a call.

How To Avoid Traveling In Basketball? 

The best way to avoid traveling is to keep your pivot foot on the ground at all times. If you’re ever in doubt, just stop dribbling and wait for the referee to make a call.

If you’re having trouble understanding when traveling is called in basketball, remember that if you take steps without dribbling the ball, you’ll most likely get hit with a violation. It’s always better to use one or two quick steps and gather the ball instead of trying to move by taking several large strides. If you don’t want to try this out and risk getting called for a travel, then just wait until the referee blows their whistle before doing anything else. 

If I Am Guarded By A Taller Player, What Can I Do To Get Open?

If you are guarded by a taller player, try to move yourself closer to the basket. This will make it impossible for him/her to get in front of you and block your shot attempt. In addition, if he/she is also guarding one of your teammates, then this will allow them to have an open shot since the taller defender won’t be able to jump.

If you’re being guarded by a taller opponent, you should immediately start moving towards the basket so that they’re not able to block any shots. If they’re also defending a teammate of yours, then having the big guy directly under the hoop means that teammate will have plenty of room to take a shot.

What Is A Zero Step In Basketball? 

The zero-step is an effective move to begin a drive toward the basket and is also known as a gather step. The reason that it’s called the gather step is because you are gathering your momentum to take a shot. It can be made from either side of your body, but for this article, we’ll only cover the right-handed version.

1) Start by bringing the ball behind your back leg with both hands while stepping forward with the opposite foot. As soon as you make contact with the floor, quickly bring the ball in front of yourself while hopping off of your non-pivot foot. Then proceed driving towards the basket for a layup or dunk attempt. 

2) Before you use this move, make sure that there isn’t any defender nearby that can steal the ball. It’s also important to note that you should only use this move if you have a clear path to the basket.

The gathering step is an effective way to start your drive because it gives you more momentum. You can either take off for a layup or dunk, or you can pull up for a jump shot. If there’s someone defending the basket, then you’ll need to use another move in order to get past them.

In conclusion, knowing how and when to use these basic basketball moves will help improve your game. Practicing them in a real game situation is the best way to see how well they work for you. Remember, always keep your pivot foot on the ground when traveling. If you can manage to do that, then you should avoid the traveling violation.

Which Foot Should Be My Pivot Foot?

If you’re a beginner, then the foot that you use as your pivot can be either one. It really doesn’t matter if you want to go with the dominant or non-dominant side because either foot will work. However, it should be noted that most players typically pick their right foot as their non-pivot and use their left foot as the pivot.

When Should I Use My Inside Hand On Offense?

An inside hand is when you dribble with your non-pivot hand, which for most people is their strong hand (or dominant hand). This means that if you’re set on using your right hand to dribble, then the ball should always stay on the right side of your body while moving up and down the court. You can dribble with either hand, but if you have a dominant side that you prefer to use, then stick with it throughout the entire game.

There are many instances where a player should use their inside hand while dribbling. If they’re going in for a layup or dunk, then the ball should always be on the non-pivot side of their body so they can protect it from defenders. This is also important during free throws because you’ll need to catch and shoot quickly before another defender gets in your face.

Since there are several reasons why an inside hand is often the best choice, the only time that it shouldn’t be used is when you’re trying to cross someone over who’s guarding your right side. In this situation, you’ll want to use your outside hand instead so you can fake them out and get past them.

In conclusion, using your inside hand is a good way to protect the ball from defenders. It’s also a good choice for free throws and layups/dunks. However, you shouldn’t use it when trying to crossover someone who’s guarding you on the right side. If you’re unsure of what move to make in a given situation, then just go with your inside hand and see how it works out.

What Happens When Someone Catches The Ball With One Or Two Hands In The Basketball?

Receiving the ball with one or both hands (regardless of which hand started holding onto it) before completing the dribble is not traveling under any circumstances. 

– When catching the ball while stationary, both hands can hold onto it simultaneously. There’s no limit on how many steps you can take after catching like there is when only one hand has the ball.

– If you’re moving when you catch the ball, then you can only take one step after catching it with both hands. 

It doesn’t matter which hand started holding onto the ball when receiving it, just as long as both hands are holding onto it when finished catching it.

There are some restrictions to passing, intercepting, and shooting after catching the ball while stationary (not in motion). 

You cannot pass, intercept or shoot if you’re jumping for the ball. It doesn’t matter how many steps you take before leaving the ground to jump for it. You can’t catch it with one hand either. If your other hand has already let go of the ball when you decide to leave your feet for it, then that’s considered traveling too under any circumstances. 

The only time that both hands have possession of the basketball while not in motion is legal is when you catch a pass from another player who threw it without gaining momentum leading up to its reach. Catching it while moving would be illegal even if you have both hands on the ball because you would be considered in control of the ball.

– You can only catch the ball with one hand if it was shot at you specifically and you are stationary. If you’re moving, then you can’t catch it with one hand no matter what.

– If someone is coming to steal the ball from you and as part of your defensive move you catch the ball with one hand, that’s legal.

– If someone throws a bad pass to you and you have to reach out for it and end up catching it with one hand, that’s legal.

How Do I Make A Euro Step?

The Euro step is an effective move that can be used to get around defenders. It’s named after European players because they were some of the first ones to start using it.

To make a Euro step, you’ll need to perform a gather step in order to get momentum going toward the basket. After that, you’ll take a quick dribble with your dominant hand while taking a big step forward with the opposite foot. Then after leaning in that same direction, you’ll take another small step with your non-pivot leg before finishing the move by stepping into the defender with your pivot foot.

In conclusion, using the Euro Step is an effective way of getting past defenders because it’s hard for them to read what direction you’re going at first. This enables you to quickly gain ground and get around them so they can’t steal or block your shot attempt. 

Conclusion 

The NCAA has created a set of rules to help ensure that there is no unfair advantage for players in basketball game officials, and players. These violations are detailed in the basketball rulebook. It’s important to be aware of these so you can avoid them or know what steps need to be taken if they occur during your next basketball game!

 

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